Gochujang Noodles

How do you like your noodles? I love them spicy, tangy and a bit sweet! These noodles with a balanced kick from gochujang (fermented korean chili paste), mild sweet notes from coconut palm sugar and tang from fresh lime juice are perfect for anytime you crave noodles- be it light summer lunches or weeknights.

Gochujang Noodles with Shrimp & Zucchini

It takes less than 30 minutes to make these and they are sought after in my house during summers. I use juicy summer zucchini and light protein such as shrimp to make them more hearty. I simply love the combination of shrimp and zucchini together! You can spiral the zucchini if you wish, in fact if you want you can make them just with zucchini spirals(noodles) for a light, low carb meal.

Gochujang is made by slowly fermenting gochugaru chili flakes and the long process of fermentation makes the chile develop a savory umami taste. It is subtly sweet and depending on the brand, the heat levels can vary- it is definitely not fiery, rather an unbelievably versatile condiment in my kitchen to pep up almost anything!

Why I love these noodles so much besides the fact that they are noodles 🙂

  • You can adjust the sour, spicy or sweet levels to your liking.
  • It can be easily made vegetarian using extra firm tofu strips or mushrooms.
  • Takes less than 30 minutes to make, even lesser if you use fresh noodles like I do.
  • Its a balanced meal – carbs, protein and vegetables all in one.

Below are the substitutions you can do to make this recipe fit different dietary needs.

  • For gluten-free version- use flat rice noddles instead of the wheat ones. Many gochujang pastes available in the market are GF, check label before buying. Use tamari instead of soy sauce.
  • Use any kinds of vegetables instead of zucchini. Broccoli, napa cabbage, mushrooms all work great.
  • Instead of soy sauce use tamari or liquid aminos.
  • Use thinly sliced chicken breast strips if you don’t want to use seafood.
  • Use tofu or mushrooms for a meat free version.
  • Instead of coconut sugar, add maple or agave for a more smoky taste.
  • If you dont have shallots at home, use thinly sliced red onions.
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Gochujang Noodles

Delicious noodles with balanced spicy, sweet sour flavors tossed with shrimp and juicy zucchini fo ra quick & simple weeknight meal.
Course Main Course
Cuisine Korean
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 12 oz fresh noodles, cooked per packet instructions or use any dried noodles that you normally use
  • 1/2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2-3 tbsp gochujang paste, adjust to tolerance
  • 2 tsp coconut sugar
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 4 tbsp cooking oil, divided
  • 6 oz extra large shrimp, cleaned
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced
  • 3 stalks scallions, white and green parts seperate
  • 4 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium zucchini, sliced
  • Salt
  • Garnish – toasted sesame seeds, cilantro etc

Instructions

  • Set the noodles to boil while you prep the sauce and vegetables. Cook as per package instructions, drain once cooked, reserve 1/2 cup noodle water and massage drained noodles with a little oil after to avoid them sticking.
  • In a small bowl, mix the soy, gochujang, sugar and lemon juice. Thin out with 2-4 tbsp noodle water since gochujang is quite thick and sticky. Taste the sauce and adjust the ingredients if needed as per your liking. At this point it should taste bold and salty. Keep ready.
  • In a 12 inch pan, heat up 1 tbsp oil on medium.Layer the shrimp, sprinkle some salt and sear/cook them for 2-3 minutes each side depending on the size of your shrimp. Take out in a plate.
  • Add another tbsp of oil and add the sliced zucchini next,sprinkle pinch of salt and quickly saute on high for 2-3 minutes so as to not overcook it. Transfer in the same plate as shrimp.
  • Add the rest of the oil to the pan and heat up on high. Add the shallots and white scallion parts for 2 minutes till they are soft. Work quickly now and next add the sliced garlic and saute for 30 minutes. Add the sauce mix that we prepped now and cook it for a minute or so with shallots and garlic till the sauce starts bubbling.Keep a close eye since the sugar caramalizes fast.
  • Add the noodles next along with shrimp & zucchini and toss everything very well so that its coated in sauce. Taste and adjust the salt. Cook for 3-4 minutes and you can use reserved noodle water (add slowly) if you feel that everything is a bit thick.
  • Sprinkle toasted sesame seeds and green scallion parts and serve immediately.

Notes

  • For gluten-free version- use flat rice noddles instead of the wheat ones.
  • Use any kinds of vegetables instead of zucchini. Broccoli, napa cabbage, mushrooms all work great.
  • Instead of soy sauce use tamari or liquid aminos.
  • Use thinly sliced chicken breast strips if you don’t want to use seafood. Cook them earlier like how we cooked shrimp in this recipe. 
  • Use tofu or mushrooms for a meat free version.
  • Instead of coconut sugar, add maple or agave for a more smoky taste.
  • If you dont have shallots at home, use thinly sliced red onions.

2 thoughts on “Gochujang Noodles

  1. Dorothy's New Vintage Kitchen – I'm a writer, cook, gardener, poet, quilter. I'm also a wife, mother, grandmother, sister. cousin, aunt, and friend, no particular order on any given day. Our family ran a small Vermont Inn for 18 years, with our focus on local, organic ingredients. After many years of daily serving up of our local delicacies, cooking classes, and catering, we are now only open for special events, cooking classes, etc. We also host musicians and artists, having helped produce a musical festival and other musical events for nearly 20 years. Many incredible people have found a place at our table. Wonderful experiences, we will treasure always. I've been a writer all my life, newspaper reporter and columnist, radio news writer, and magazine contributor, but now turn my attention to my cookbook, the blog, and a cooking column "Memorable Meals," which runs in our county newspaper. I write poetry as the spirit wills, and the occasional short story. My family and friends are my practice subjects. With a family that includes nut, peanut, tree fruit, and vegetable allergies, gluten intolerance, dairy intolerance, vegetarians, vegans, heart conscious, and a couple of picky eaters, there has to be a few quick tricks in the book to keep everyone fed and happy! Personally, I do not eat meat or dairy (usually), I do eat fish and seafood, so I try to come up with alternatives and substitutions when available. I serve local organic eggs and cheeses to my family who can tolerate dairy (I need to watch my own cholesterol so I am careful, but have been know to let a little piece of really good cheese accidentally fall on my plate!). I cook by the seasons and draw on inspiration from the strong and talented women in my family who came before me as well as the youngers in the family who look at the world with fresh eyes. Food links us all, whether sharing a meal, cooking it together, or writing about it for others to read. I enjoy taking an old recipe and giving it a modern spin, especially if I can make it a littler healthier and use foods that are kinder to the Earth and to our bodies. I believe strongly in sustainable, delicious eating of whole foods! And finally, I love conversing with all the talented cooks and chefs out there who dot the globe! It's a wonderful, world full of culinary penpals! XXXOOO
    Dorothy's New Vintage Kitchen on said:

    This looks beautifully spicy!

  2. I had never heard of gochujang chili paste before, but luckily I managed to find it at my local Asian store. This recipe is a winner! So simple and so flavourful, we love it! We used oyster mushrooms instead of shrimp and that worked out super. We’re definitely making this comfort food again!

    Lots of love from Belgium!

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