Breads/Flatbreads

Bedmi Poori

Bedmi Poori is a popular street side breakfast in Delhi and Uttar Pradesh. A coarse urad dal (lentil) paste is kneaded with whole wheat flour along with spices, rolled and deep fried. Bedmi Poori are served with aloo ki sabzi(spicy potato curry) and khatta meetha kaddu (sweet & sour pumpkin).

Bedmi pooris make for a perfect weekend breakfast and are great for festivals and celebrations. Poori is puffy deep fried flatbread popular all across India. You can check out my recipe of poori here. Poori dough is usually made with just flour, however addition of coarse lentil paste to the dough makes bedmi pooris unique and so delicious!

If you happen to visit streets of Old Delhi, you will see every other stall selling bedmi poori – sabzi. Street side pooris are one of the most delicious things. The aroma of spices and lentils filling up the air whenpooris deep fry is simply irrestible and it hard to cross by without sampling a bite. Other than Old Delhi, I loved having these on our trip to Agra at food stalls outside Taj Mahal as well as in narrow lanes of Mathura.

What kind of lentils can be used?

Traditionally, urad lentils are used to make bedmi poori. However, you can use yellow mung lentils as well as chana dal (bengal gram lentils). A variety of whole spices like fennel, nigella and cumin are added to the dough along with ginger, green chili paste and lots of hing(asafetida). Urad lentils in the dough make the pooris taste so amazing but at the same time because since they are protein rich and heavu lentil variety, they can sometimes lead to bloating. Thats why adding all the spices(particularly the fennel, hing & ginger) makes them easily digestible as well as super flavorful. It is amazing how these traditional recipes have been developed keeping real nourishment to the body in mind.

How is Bedmi Poori made?

Making bedmi poori is similar to making pooris. The difference is only in the ingredients of the dough. You make a tight (but not dry) spiced lentil and whole wheat flour dough, rest it (super important) and then roll it into 4 or 5 inch discs and deep fry. Watch this video to get an idea of how these pooris are made.

How to serve Bedmi Poori?

As I already mentioned, bedmi pooris are served with a spicy potato curry and pumpkin curry. But really you can serve them with dum aloo or paneer curry or any curry you like. I love them with a cup of chai just on their own. Served with chai they remind me of childhood train trips. You can also serve raita(yogurt) and pickle with these pooris.

Important Tips and Tricks to keep in mind when making bedmi pooris:-

  1. Always soak the lentils in water. This helps in even grinding as well as better taste of the lentils. However, do not soak the lentils for more than 4-6 hours. This is a little tip of my mom – who says that this way the pooris don’t absorb a lot of oil. I swear by it 🙂
  2. Don’t go overboard on spices or chilies. Spices make these pooris really tasty, however, these pooris should primarily taste of urad lentils.
  3. When you make the dough, add water slowly and make a stiff dough for pooris.
  4. You can add a little bit of semolina to the dough for added crispness. I sometimes do it too.
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Bedmi Poori

Lentil and whole wheat flour pooris (puffed flatbread). A popular street food from Delhi & Uttar Pradesh. These pooris are traditionally served with spicy potato curry and sweet & sour pumpkin.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Breakfast, Side Dish
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 12 pooris

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup split & skinned urad dal
  • 2.5 cup whole wheat flour (atta)
  • 2 inch fresh ginger, roughly chopped
  • 2 thai bird green chillies
  • 1.5 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1/2 tsp nigella seeds
  • 1.5 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp red chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp hing
  • 1.5 tsp salt
  • 3 tbsp oil (while kneading the dough)
  • Oil for frying

Instructions

  • Wash the urad lentils 2-3 times. Soak for 6 hours.
  • Once soaked, drain the water completely.
  • Add lentils to a grinder/blender along with ginger, green chilies, cumin, fennel, nigella, red chili powder and hing. Grind the dal to a coarse paste. If needed, add as little water as possible (1-2 tbsp).
  • In a large bowl, add flour, ground lentils and salt. Mix everything with hands. Add oil and mix as well.
  • Start adding little water and knead into a firm stiff dough. I used about 1/3 cup water. Add water slowly while kneading. Knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes to make as smooth as possible. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and rest for 20 minutes.
  • Pinch equal portions form the dough depending on how large/small or thin/thick you want to make pooris. Roll the portions into smooth balls
  • In a kadai/wide pot, set oil on a medium high stove to heat up.
  • Without using any dry flour, roll the balls into to a 3-4 inch circle. You can use little bit of oil while rolling if needed.
  • Slide the rolled poori into the hot oil and deep fry till slightly browned from both the sides. Gently press the pooris while frying so that they puff up. Drain them on a plate lined with paper towel. Repeat till all pooris are fried up. Serve.

Notes

  • Always soak the lentils in water. This helps in even grinding as well as better taste of the lentils. However, do not soak the lentils for more than 4-6 hours. This is a little tip of my mom – who says that this way the pooris don’t absorb a lot of oil. I swear by it 🙂
  • Don’t go overboard on spices  or chili. Spices make these pooris really tasty, however, these pooris should primarily taste of urad lentils.
  • When you make the dough, add water slowly and make a stiff dough for pooris.
  • You can add a little bit of semolina to the dough for added crispness. I sometimes do it too.
Breads/Flatbreads

Methi Naan (Instant No Yeast Naan)

Pillowy no yeast instant naan with the flavor of fresh methi (fenugreek leaves) and garlic in every bite. This Instant naan recipe does not use any yeast or eggs and it gets ready in about 30-40 minutes. The naan are cooked on stove top and they are soft and absolutely delicious.

Naan is one of the most popular bread from the indian subcontinent and it is basically leavened dough which is rolled and cooked in high heat of the tandoor (clay ovens). However, there is a way to get the same taste at home without using tandoor. The best part about the naan is its charred on top puffy pockets and this recipe will get you both those things without using any tandoor.

My mom always made stove top naan or tandoori rotis to go along with dal makhani. She would use yogurt to knead the dough and served straight off the stove, those charred soft naan were one of the best things in the world. I have shared my tandoori roti method here in this post and this naan recipe is quite similar in terms of cooking process but of course the dough is different from tandoori roti.

What is Methi (Fresh Fenugreek Leaves)?

Methi or fresh fenugreek leaves are a very popular winter greens in india and they are used in a ton of curries – both vegetarian and non vegetarian throughout the year. The taste of methi is pleasantly bitter sweet and when it is in season, super aromatic varieties of methi leaves are dried and preserved and they are used to flavor a lot of north indian curries.

I love the flavor of methi as the winter is approaching, its one of my favorite greens and here I added fresh chopped methi to the naan dough. To augment the taste of fresh methi, I also added some kasuri methi which makes these naan super flavorful. Last year on Diwali, I shared these garlic methi pooris and the combination of methi and garlic is just mind blowing in everything! Pair these naan with the rich festive savory dishes the you will make this season. Or if you ask me, just with a dab or ghee, these are so good on their own!

How to make Methi Naan?

  1. The dough of the naan uses basic ingredients like flour, yogurt, baking soda, oil etc. All you need to do is add chopped methi and knead a firm dough. If you do not want to use methi, simply skip it and use the same recipe to make regular instant naan on stove top.
  2. Once the dough is ready, resting the dough is one of the most important part of the process to let the yogurt and baking soda do their magic towards attaining that soft chewy texture of the naan.
  3. Once the dough has rested, simply roll out the dough into oval or tear shaped bread and cook it on stove top, no oven is needed.

Here’s a visual guide to making these naan :-

Few Important tips to keep in mind when you make these naan :-

  1. Dough :- The dough uses very basic ingredients from your pantry. If you want you can make this dough a few hours(3-4) ahead and store it refrigerated. Whenever you want to serve, roll the naan and serve! However do not make it a day ahead or more than 6 hours ahead, trust me the taste changes and they will taste of soda!
  2. Methi – Fresh fenugreek leaves are easily available during fall & winter months in indian stores as well as in farmer markets. Get the freshest methi you can find. Clean the methi – which basically involves separating the leaves from the stems. Wash, dry and finely chop the leaves and add to the dough. An important thing to keep in mind is to chop the methi leaves using a knife only. Do not use choppers or food processor to chop methi since it sometimes becomes watery or is unevenly chopped. Another important thing to keep in mind is that when you are making the dough, remember that the methi leaves will release a little bit of water while resting due to salt in the dough. So keep in mind to make a firm dough to begin with.If the dough is too soft and pliable in the beginning, then it will be a sticky mess after resting.
  3. Rolling the Naan :- Use the naan as you would roll your rotis. Traditionally naan are tear drop or curvy triangle shaped but trust me don’t worry too much about it – a simple oval or round shape will work as well. It should taste good, that all matters if you ask me 🙂
  4. Naan Toppings :- You can keep them plain but really the combination of methi and chopped garlic is mind-blowing! A lot of toppings are possible and you can choose what you like. Use sesame seeds, black poppy seeds, nigella seeds, chopped cilantro, chili flakes or chopped onions and green chilies for fun flavors.

Do check out other methi flatbread recipes from the blog like garlic methi pooris and methi ke parathe(flatbreads).

Pair these naan with these curries :-

Khoya Paneer Kali Mirch

Navratan Korma

Dal Makhani

Matar Paneer

Dum Aloo

Dahi Vaale Dum Aloo

Chicken Korma

Paneer Lababdar

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Methi Naan (Instant No Yeast Method)

Instant methi flavored naan which needs no eggs or yeast and is cooked on stovetop. No oven or tandoor needed. These are fragrant with methi, soft and delicious!
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 6 to 8 naan

Ingredients

  • 2 cup All purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed chopped methi leaves (from 1 bunch methi (about 60 g leaves)) , see notes
  • 1 tsp kasuri methi (dried fernugreek leaves, crushed fine between palms)
  • 1/2 cup plain thick, whole yogurt
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 2-6 tbsp room temperature water, as needed
  • 2 tbsp chopped garlic

Instructions

  • Sift the flour, salt, sugar and baking soda in a large bowl.
  • Add yogurt, oil, kasuri methi & methi leaves and first knead without water to mix together the yogurt and oil with the flour. The flour will absorb the moisture of yogurt and slowly methi will start realeasing its moisture as well. Mix for about 2 minutes like this to incorporate the flavors.
  • Slowly start adding water a little at a time and beginkneading the dough. Keep kneading the dough and make a soft yet firm dough. I used exactly 1/4 cup of water. You may need less or more depending on absorption quality of your flour and also on the water content of yogurt that you use. Keep in mind that the dough should not be squishy else after resting it will become very sticky since the methi leaves will release bit of their water due to salt in the dough.
  • Once kneaded, cover with a damp cloth or paper towel and let the dough rest for atleast 25 minutes. If the temperature is cold, rest the dough for attest 1.5 hours. During warm weather 25-30 minutes will be more than enough.
  • Heat up a heavy, 12 inch cast iron griddle on medium high heat.
  • Once the dough has rested, divide the dough into 6 portions. Roll the portions into smooth balls. You can make the naan a bit smaller or less thick as well and go for 8 portions instead. Keep the portions covered while you start rolling them one by one.
  • Lightly dust your rolling surface. Using a rolling pin,gently roll out each portion into 1/4 inch thickness. Don't press too hard while rolling else the naan won't puff up. If you feel that the dough is getting a bit sticky, use dry flour to roll easily.
  • Brush a little water on top of the naan and press down chopped garlic so that they stick. Flip the naan and brush a little water all over the bottom side of the naan, this helps the naan in sticking to the pan.
  • To cook on Flame Stove top :- Place the naan, non garlic side side on the hot tawa. Wait for about 5-7 seconds and then cover the naan with a lid. In about 30-40 seconds the naan will start puffing up due to formation of air pockets. Uncover, lift the tawa and flip it so that the garlic side of the naan is directly exposed to the flame. You can move the tawa a bit so as to make sure that the full naan is exposed to the flame. In about 6-8 seconds the naan will start getting charred all over. Once nicely browned all over, its ready. Use a spatula to lift the naan from the tawa and brush it with melted ghee or butter. Serve warm. Enjoy!
  • To cook on Electric Stove top :- Place the naan, non garlic side side on the hot tawa. Wait for about 5-7 seconds and then cover the naan with a lid. In about 30-40 seconds the naan will start puffing up due to formation of air pockets. Uncover, and using a spatula, flip the naan to cook on the others side. Cook for 8 seconds or so for a nice char. Once nicely browned all over, its ready. Use a spatula to lift the naan from the tawa and brush it with melted ghee or butter. Serve warm. Enjoy!

Notes

  1. Clean, wash and air dry methi before chopping. 
Breads/Flatbreads

Pudina (Fresh Mint) Paratha

Growing up, parathas, plain, stuffed or spiced with all sorts of herbs and spices were one of the most regular things that mom made for us. I do the same now, parathas are a huge staple in our house, made probably more than any indian other flatbread. The kids love them with curries, in wraps and as a quick snack on its own.

These pudina paratha are flaky, fragrant & layered and pair well with just about anything. Pudina translates to “mint” and paratha is unleavened flatbread very popular in northern parts of India. With creamy mughlai curries they are just amazing, the hints of cooling mint flavor of these parathas complement the rich sauce very well.

Whenever I have a bunch of fresh mint to finish, I usually make a dough and make them layered laccha paratha style. Its so good on its own as well and gets better next day. I know many people like freshly made rotis or parathas but we love them anyhow, fresh or a day old. You can shape them circular or make triangle parathas as well if you dont want to make layered or are in a hurry.

I like a combination of fresh mint with cumin, ginger, fennel and a little chaat masala. The ginger is so good in here with chaat masala. Sometimes I add dried mint, sometimes I dont, I find dried mint a bit chalky and prefer using fresh mint as much as I can. The recipe is very straightforward and really its all about making a flavored dough, resting it and turning it into parathas. Read it below.

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Pudina(fresh Mint) paratha

Whole wheat flour parathas pacjed with flavor of fresh mint and spices. Pair well with curries of any kind. Or use as a wrap.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 6 parathas

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup heaped (20 gms) tightly packet fresh mint leaves , finely chopped, use just the leaves, save stems for something else.
  • 2 cup whole wheat flour (atta)
  • 2 tbsp besan (chickpea flour)
  • 2 tbsp oil
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/2 tsp coarsely crushed fennel seeds
  • 1 tbsp very finely chopped ginger
  • 1 tsp chaat masala
  • 1/2 tsp dried mint
  • 1/2 tsp salt (or to taste)
  • 2/3 cup water or as needed
  • 3-4 tbsp oil or ghee (for rolling the laccha paratha)
  • dry flour needed while rolling
  • oil for cooking

Instructions

  • In a mixing bowl, add the ingredients – flour, besan, mint(fresh & dried), spices, 2 tbsp oil and salt. Using your fingers mix everything well.
  • Now start adding water in parts. Initially you can add ½ cup water. Thereafter, the amount of water required depends upon the absorption quality of the flour.
  • Mix and begin to knead the dough. Add water as needed and knead for 3-5 minutes to make a smooth and firm dough. It should not be very loose or sticky. I used about 2/3 cup water.
  • Cover the dough and let rest for 30 minutes.
  • Divide the rested dough into equal portions and using your palms make them into medium sized balls. You can make them larger if you want thicker parathas.
  • Place the dough ball on a rolling surface and sprinkle some dry flour on both sides.
  • Roll the dough into a large thin circle of about 10 inch diameter. Dont worry about the shape right now, it should be thin.
  • Brush oil on the top surface(you can sprinkle a little more chaat massala if you wish) and begin to fold from edges like a hand fan, making thin pleates on top of each other.
  • Once there is a thick pleated long roll of the dough, fold it inwards like a spiral into a circle dough ball. Press down lightly, sprinkle dry flour.
  • Meanwhile, set a tawa to heat up on medium high stove. Roll the dough ball to a paratha of 6 inches. These will be slightly thick.
  • Place the paratha on the hot tawa. Keep the flame to medium high. Don't cook on low flame.
  • When you see paratha puffing on the top, flip it. Liberally spread oil on the cooked side.
    Flip and repeat for the second side. After you apply oil. toast nicely on both sides. You can make them crispy or keep them soft.
  • Crush a little before serving, that way the layers separate a bit but this step is optional.
  • Serve them. These keep for 1-2 days well in the fridge as well. Just warm them slightly on a suoer hot tawa before serving.
Breads/Flatbreads · Brunch · Indian Streetfood/Indo Chines

Paneer Makhani Pizza

Paneer pizzas are a huge favorite in our house and this one is no different. From scratch pizza with a pillowy dough, quick makhani sauce made out of fresh tomatoes and topped with juicy paneer tikka. To add some kick, I add pickled jalapeños. This pizza is a riot of flavors in every bite.

Until last year, before lockdown, I considered as pizza one of the most casual food. Pizza nights were either take outs or something put together with off the shelf items from Trader Joe’s. Quick pizzas did the job but I knew in my heart that I was missing out on something.

Last year, when everyone was struggling to find yeast last year, so was I. But I kept looking and looking and nearly after a month I found yeast online. Took over 20 days to deliver and then started my quest for homemade pizza dough. 

Right from how the house smells while pizza bakes to how the dough feels between my fingers, the entire process of making pizza from scratch can be so gratifying.. It swells my heart to see kids enjoying desi pizza- one filled with orange sauce and topped paneer, it’s their huge favorite.

Desi pizzas are a huge hit in our home, here I make a quick makhani sauce and paneer tikka. You can use chicken as well instead of paneer. You can make the dough, the sauce as well as marinate the tikka ahead of time and just assemble and pop into the oven or pizza oven (if you have one) anytime for a quick treat!

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Paneer Makhani Pizza

A fusion indo – italian pizza with homemade pizza dough topped with makhani sauce, juicy paneer tikka and lots of cheese.
Prep Time2 hrs 30 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Course: Main Course, Snack
Cuisine: Indian, Italian
Servings: 1 Pizza (12 inch)

Equipment

  • mixing bowls

Ingredients

Make the Pizza Dough

  • 2-2.5 cups all purpose flour (250-290gms)
  • 1 package active dry yeast (7gm)
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1.5 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 3/4 cup warm water

Quick Makhani Sauce (Makes about 2 cups)

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 1 inch cinnamon stick
  • 4 green cardamom
  • 1 clove
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onions
  • 1.5 tbsp ginger garlic paste
  • 2.5-3 cups tomato puree (Simply blanch 4-5 large fresh tomatoes and puree them in blender)
  • 1/2 tsp kashmiri chilli powder
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1.5 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tbsp kasuri methi
  • 2 tbsp heavy cream

Paneer Tikka

  • 150 gms paneer cut in cubes
  • 1 tbsp yogurt
  • 1 tbsp ginger garlic paste
  • 1/2 tsp coriander powder
  • 1/2 tsp hot chilli powder or to taste
  • 1/2 tbsp fresh lemom juice
  • 1 tsp kasuri methi
  • 1/2 tsp chaat masala
  • 1/2 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • Salt to taste

Pizza Toppings

  • Shredded low moisture mozarella cheese as much or as less you like
  • Sliced Onions as much or as less you like
  • Pickled Jalapenos as much or as less you like

Instructions

Make the pizza dough

  • In a small bowl, empty the yeast packet. Add 3 tbsp luke warm water (of the 3/4 cup), add sugar, give a gentle mix and let the yeast bloom for 5 minutes. You should see bubbles once bloomed else start over.
  • In a large bowl, add the 2 cups flour salt, olive oil and garlic powder. Using your fingers mix everthing well. You can add some dried herbs to the flour as well.
  • Pour the yeast mix over the flour. Add remaining water. Using your hand mixer attached with the dough hook, mix the dough for a minute on medium speed or so till it starts clumping around the hook into a ball.
  • On a floured surface, take out the dough ball and knead for 3-4 minutes until its smooth and springs back when you press it with a finger. Add a little flour if the dough feels wet at any point. Pizza dough should not be sticky but its a pretty soft dough.
  • Place the dough in a large oiled bowl. Rub the surface of the dough ball with some olive oil. Cover with a cloth or cling film and place in warm place to rise for 1-2 hours (depends on the tempetature of where you live). The dough should double in volume after the rise.

Make the Makhani Sauce

  • In a pan, warm up the butter and oil together. Add the whole spices – cloves, cardamom & cinnmaon and saute for 15 seconds. Add the onions to the pan and saute the onions till lightly browned for about 3 minutes.
  • Once the onions are browned, add the ginger garlic paste along with the powdered spices. Saute for 30 seconds.
  • Add the tomato puree next and mix well. Let the tomato puree cook down for about 5 minutes tll you see that the sauce is thick and oil is starting to seperate. Switch off the stove. Dont dry the tomatoes too much, add 1/4 cup water if needed to make a thick slurry like consistency sauce.
  • Strain the makhani sauce into a bowl and immediately mix in the cream, garam masala and kasuri methi. Mix well. Makhani sauce is ready to go.

Make the Paneer Tikka

  • In a bowl, add all the ingredints except paneer. Using a whisk, mix well to make a smooth paste.
  • Add the paneer cubes and mix well to coat using your fingers. Marinate for 15 minutes.
  • Once marinated you can cook the paneer on a heated tawa brushing oil on all sides. Alternatively, you can skewer the paneer, brush oil and broil in oven for 3-4 minutes each side. Dont cook the panner too much since it will cook with the pizza as well.

Assebmle and Bake Pizza

  • Preheat ypur oven to 475 F. I use my seasoned cast iron skillet to bake pizza. You can use your baking sheet lined with parchment paper or pizza steel (if you have one).
  • Punch down the risen dough and on a floured surface, using your hands in a circular motion shape it in a circle.
  • Place the shaped pizza dough into the cast iron griddle/baking sheet/pizza steel.
  • Laddle makhani sauce on top of the dough leaving a little space from the edges. Add the shredded cheese over the sauce.
  • Place the paneer tikka, onions and jalapenos on top of cheese. Drizzle with a little oil.
  • Bake the dough for 8-12 minutes untill the cheese has melted and the edges are golden.
  • Slice & Serve. Enjoy!

Notes

  1. Use chicken in this recipe instead of paneer to make chicken makkahi pizza.
  2. Use any kind of vegetables for topping.
  3. You make make all the elements 1-2 days in advance and assemble and bake the pizza. This dough rests well in the fridge for 2 days after proofing.  
Breads/Flatbreads · How To

Spinach Tandoori Roti (Stove Top Method)

Tandoori rotis are as as popular as naan in India. They are soft inside and crispy to bite into and pair so well with all kinds of indian curries or lentils. I prefer them on most days because they use whole wheat flour (hence more nutrition & fiber) than naan.

I grew up eating dad’s paani vaali roti. Few days of the year when he entered the kitchen, he made these special thick doughy rotis– cooked on tawa(griddle) and smeared with lots of ghee. He spread water on on side of the roti to make it stick to the griddle and then cooked the other side by flipping the tawa over direct flame. What came out of the kitchen were immensely delicious flatbreads which were soft and chewy as well as super crispy. I remember eating them with chana dal.

The recipe of this spinach tandoori roti is based on those flatbreads. The rotis are made on the stove top, there is no oven or tandoor needed and they taste the same as you would get at dhabas in India, I promise.

You can use this same recipe to make regular tandoori rotis at home. Just skip the spinach puree part and knead the dough with water.

  1. I use cooking spinach in this recipe. Avoid using baby spinach(that is just for the pictures :))
  2. Rest the dough well. It is important for soft rotis.
  3. We knead the dough using thick, pureed cooked spinach. That gives the best spinach taste to the rotis. Avoid kneading with water or using a very watery pureed spinach.
  4. Dont use non stick pan or tawa for this recipe. We want the roti to stick to the griddle so that we can flip and cook them on the direct flame. If you are using a cast iron pan, make sure that it has no oil. Our purpose is to make the roti stick to the tawa 🙂
  5. The recipe uses 1 tbsp of yogurt but you can substitute it with any plant yogurt for vegan version.
  6. Use plant fat substitute to smear on top and make them vegan.
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Spinach Tandoori Roti

A wholesome, nutritious Indian flatbread loaded with spinach. It is soft yet crispy and is made on stove top.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 6 rotis

Equipment

  • Griddle, rolling pin, rolling surface, bowls & spoons

Ingredients

Cook the Spinach

  • 100 gms cooking spinach, cleaned
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp salt

For the Rotis

  • 1 cup whole wheat flour(atta)
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour(maida)
  • 1 tbsp thick yogurt/greek yogurt
  • 1/4 tsp hing
  • pinch ajwain(carrom seeds)
  • 1/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • 1.5 tbsp oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2-3/4 cup thick pureed spinach(prepared above)

For topping the Rotis

  • 2 tbsp finely chopped garlic
  • 1/2 tsp nigella seeds
  • Ghee to smear

Instructions

Make the Spinach Puree

  • Wash spinach 3-4 times in water. Make sure all the dirt is removed from the spinach. Remove any thick and tough stems. You dont need to remove all the stems.
  • In a large pot of water, bring water to a boil. Add the cleaned spinach to the water and press down using a large spoon. Slowly the leaves will wilt, the spinach will soften and get soaked in water. Cook on high heat in boiling water for 6-8 minutes till the spinach is dark green. Switch off the stove and let cook for 10 minutes.
  • Add the boiled spinach(along with whatever water is remaining) to a high spped blender, add salt, hing and cumin seeds. Blend on high heat to a smooth fine puree. The puree should be thick like a smoothie consistency. Dont make a watery puree. If needed add a little water while grinding. You should get about 3/4 cup thick spinach puree.

Make the Dough

  • In a wide dish/paraat or you can use your stand mixer as well add the flours, salt, sugar, carrom seeds, yogurt, oil and baking powder. Using fingers rub the flour so that everything is mixed well and the flour is little moistened.
  • Start incorpotating the spinach puree a little at a time and kneading. Each time you add the puree, let it mix well with the dough.
  • As the atta absorbs spinach puree,it will start clumping up into a ball.Continue to add till all the dry flour becomes wet, your hands will be mighty messy but the flour will come together.Remember not to add too much puree at a time.
  • Once a ball is formed, ensure that it is not very dry by trying to squeeze the dough ball between your palms as if making a fist and it should feel firm. Since we added salt to the dough, when the dough will rest it will get a little soft. Start using your knuckles to knead the dough next.
  • Use your knuckles to flatten the dough out and then pull it all together towards yourself, using your palm & fingers, then knead again with knuckles to flatten out. Knead this way (flatten and bring together) repeatedly for 7-8 minutes.
  • Towards the last 1-2 minutes of kneading, use both hands to knead for a very smooth & elastic dough (this will work up the gluten really fast). Once the dough looks and feels really really smooth, cover with a kitchen towel and let rest for (not more than) 30 minutes.If you are not planning to make rotis right away, place the dough into an air tight container with lid and refrigerate.
  • When ready to make rotis, uncover and divide into equal portions.(Note: If you refrigerated the dough, take it out 10-15 minutes before and let sit on kitchen counter).
  • Take each dough portion between palms of your both hands and roll to make as smooth balls as possible. Flatten the balls. Get some loose atta on another dish.
  • Set a tawa(griddle) on the stove to heat. Dont use non stick pan or tawa for this recipe. We want the roti to stick to the griddle.
  • Roll and cover each ball in the loose atta and place on a smooth rolling stone or pastry board or kitchen surface. Flatten out lightly on edges using tips of your finger. Using a rolling-pin, start rolling the dough to a oval shape.Dust the board or the roti as and when required when rolling.
  • Once rolled, spread 1-1.5 tbsp of water on one side of the roti and immediately place it water side down on the tawa. Keep the flame medium low.
  • Press a little bit of garlic and sprinkle some nigella seeds on the top of roti. You can press down a little so that they stick to the dough.
  • In 1-2 minutes,you will see bubbles on top of the roti. At this time, lift the tawa and invert it on direct flame. The roti wil start getting chars, keep on moving the tawa and make sure that entire surface of the roti is nice and charred.
  • Ideally when the roti is nicely cooked, it will start pulling away from the tawa. Using a large flat spatula, carefully seprate the roti from the griddle and serve rightaway!

Notes

  1. I use cooking spinach in this recipe. Avoid using baby spinach(that is just for the pictures :))
  2. Rest the dough well. It is important for soft rotis.
  3. We knead the dough using thick, pureed cooked spinach. That gives the best spinach taste to the rotis. Avoid kneading with water or using a very watery pureed spinach.
  4. Dont use non stick pan or tawa for this recipe. We want the roti to stick to the griddle so that we can flip and cook them on the direct flame. If you are using a cast iron pan, make sure that it has no oil. Our purpose is to make the roti stick to the tawa 🙂
  5. The recipe uses 1 tbsp of yogurt but you can substitute it with any plant yogurt for vegan version.
  6. Use plant fat substitute to smear on top and make them vegan.
  7. Use plain warm water (a little over 1/2 cup) instead of spinach puree to knead the dough if you want to make regular tandoori rotis. The rest of the recipe remains SAME. 
Breads/Flatbreads · Brunch

Stuffed Paneer Paratha

Soft and delicious stuffed paratha(flatbread) perfect with a bowl of raita(yogurt) and chutney. These are super easy to make especially is you prep a bit ahead. Fresh homemade crumbled paneer is the best choice here. You can refer to one of my past posts on how to make paneer at home. That is exactly how I make fresh crumbled paneer for parathas. Just follow the steps and skip the block making part.

Over the years, I have changed this recipe a bit from my mom’s. I used to feel that fresh crumbled paneer tasted a bit chalky in a paratha when used as it is. So now I saute the crumbled paneer with spices before mixing it with onions, chllies and cilantro. The result is a very flavorful filling which is fragrant and has a lot of texture.

Keep a few things in mind when you are making these.

  • Make the dough fresh and rest it (super important). The dough should not be too tight or too soft, in either case you won’t be able to roll the parathas. It is also super important to knead the dough for about 5-8 minutes to smoothen it out, it helps develop the gluten which is important for the right texture of the parathas.
  • When you saute the paneer, dont dry it out or brown it, thats not the purpose. We just want to add a lot of flavor with spices crackled in oil and sautéed with paneer.
  • Cook the parathas on a medium hot skillet using enough oil. Flip them carefully because they will be soft. Don’t press too much.
Print Recipe
4 from 1 vote

Stuffed Paneer Paratha

A soft and flavorful indian flatbread (paratha) stuffed with fresh paneer, herb and spices filling.
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Course: Breakfast, Main Course, Snack
Cuisine: Indian
Servings: 6 parathas
Author: Tanvi

Equipment

  • Skillet, Rolling board and pin, 2 Bowls, Pan

Ingredients

For the Dough

  • 1.5 cup atta (whole wheat flour)
  • 2 tsp oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • luke warm water, as needed
  • Extra flour for dusting while rolling the parathas

For the Paneer Filling

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp tumeric powder
  • Pinch of ajwain (carrom seeds)
  • 1 cup crumbled paneer
  • 3/4 tsp garam masala adjust to taste
  • 1/4 tsp amchoor
  • 1/4 cup onions finely chopped
  • 2-3 thai green chillies (adjust to taste) finely chopped
  • 1-2 tbsp fresh cilantro finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ginger finely chopped
  • Cooking oil as needed

Instructions

Making the Dough

  • In a large bowl, add the flour, oil and salt.
  • Gently mix with hands to combine everything together.
  • Start adding water slowly and mixing with the flour. Bring the flour together, adding water and squeezing continously with finger to bring it together to form a ball. I used a little over 1/2 cup water. Adjust water quantity depending on quality of the atta you are using.
  • Once the flour has come together, stop adding water and keep kneading for good 5-7 minutes or more to smoothen out into a soft ball, if at any point you feel that the flour is drying out or is too tight, add little water.
  • Once the dough is smooth and kneaded well, cover it with a damp cloth and let rest for 20 minutes.

Make the Filling

  • While the dough is resting, make the filling. Heat up 1 tbsp oil in a pan on low medium and crackle the cumin and ajwain seeds in there. Take take not to burn the spices. After 10 seconds, add the paneer and sprinkle all the powdered spices. Mix well and on low heat, saute the paneer for about 5 minutes. Dont let brown or dry out.
  • Once done, transfer to a bowl, let cool down a bit and add the chopped onions, ginger chillies and cilantro. Add a pinch of sugar. Mix very well. The filling is ready.

Make the Paratha

  • Place a tawa or cast iron griddle on the stove to heat up. Divide the rested dough into equal portions, you should get about 6 or 7.
  • Dust the dough portions in dry flour and roll into a 4 inch circle using a rolling pin. Place about 2 tbsp of filling in the center and bring around the sides of the dough to make a small round parcel.
  • Dust the rolling surface liberally and roll the stuffed dough parcel into a 7 inch circle. Dont press too much while rolling, ideally place yur rolling pin half on the surface and half on the dough for even rolling thickness. Make them as thick or thin you like.
  • Place the hot tawa. After 15 seconds, or when you see bubbles on top, flip the paratha, brush oil (about 1 tbsp), flip and let cook on oil side, brush oil on the second side, flip and cook till both the sides are golden. Dont press too much when cooking the paratha.
  • Repeat the above steps for the rest of the dough.
  • Serve wam with yogurt, butter, pickles or chutney.
Breads/Flatbreads

Garlic- Methi Poori

Poori are a festival favorite. These pooris are so delicious eaten as it is or with your favorite curry. I like to use fresh chopped methi leaves and a combination of flours which makes them just so crisp and perfect texture.

A few tablespoons of sooji(semolina) make the pooris crisp and alsohelps in making the dough not too soggy since semolina can absorb a lot of moisture. My mom always adds a little bit of grated potato to dough that she makes for pooris or bhaturas and really it make a huge difference in the taste and texture even though you cannot really taste the potato.

Make a firm dough and rest it for at least 30 minutes. Resting helps in mingling of flavors as well as the pooris come out crisp from outside and soft from inside.

Recipe

Ingredients (Makes 12-15 pooris)

  • 1/2 cup maida (all purpose flour)
  • 1/2 cup atta (whole wheat flour)
  • 3 tbsp fine semolina (sooji)
  • 1.5 tbsp finely chopped garlic
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped methi (fenugreek) leaves
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped cilantro
  • 1/2 tsp ajwain
  • 1/4 tsp hing
  • 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 small potato (yield 1/4 cup) boiled potato, grated (not mashed)
  • 3/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • 1/2 tsp coriander powder
  • Red chilli powder to taste
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp cooking oil
  • 5 tbsp water for kneading (or as needed)
  • Oil for frying (about 3 cups)

Method

In a wide paraat/dish sift the flours. Add the garlic, chopped methi, cilantro and all the spices. Using your hands, mix everything so that all the spices, greens and potatoes are evenly distributed.

Add the oil and mix again with the flour mixture. Add salt, mix and start adding water little by little. We want to make a tight but not a dry dough. I used about 5 tablespoons of water to get to the right dough, you might need less or more depending on the quality of your flour. Also keep in mind that due to salt in the dough, the methi leaves and cilantro will release water so the dough will get a bit soft as it rests.

Keep adding water and kneading the dough, pressing down using your knuckles, gathering it again by folding it over itself and kneading again. It will take about 5-7 minutes of kneading to get a firm dough. Make it into a ball and place in in a container and cover with a lid. Do not leave the dough to rest without covering it. Let the dough rest for ablest 30 minutes.

Set oil to heat up in a deep kadai or pot. Pinch equal sized portions of the dough and smothen between your palms to make lime sized balls. Flatten the balls down on your work surface, (dont add any dry flour) and using a rolling pin roll into a 3 inch or 4 inch circles. Repeat for all the portions and keep the pooris covered with a dry cloth. You can use a little bit of oil if you need when rolling.

To test the oil, pinch a little portion of the dough and add it to the oil. If it comes up sizzling, oil is too hot, and if it settles to bottom, oil is cold. The dough should rise up without sizzling at the right temperature of the oil.

Fry pooris one by one. Add the rolled poori to the oil, in 2-4 seconds start pressing in down gently this will help in puffing them, these won’t puff a lot since the dough is loaded, flip and fry on second side for 8-10 seconds. Drain on a paper towel. Fry all the pooris similarly.

Serve right away or you can store them for 24 hours in your roti container.

Enjoy!

Breads/Flatbreads

Chausela With Lauki Raita

Chausela – A rustic flatbread.It is quite similar to gujarati thepla. Not as thin as theplas though and what makes them special is these flatbreads are cooked in mustard oil. There is raw mustard oil in the dough giving them a smoky flavor. On hot summer days, these are amazing for lunch with a cold raita made with tender lauki or shredded cucumber, a garlicky chili chutney and achaar. These cannot be stored like theplas, make a fresh dough, cooked and serve right off the skillet.

My grandmother’s family had western ultra pradesh influence and this flatbread is a perfect example of regional recipe gems embedded in the heart of indian states. The dough is not gluten-free, a little atta (whole wheat flour) is added for binding. Chopped onions, ginger garlic along with spinach(or any greens can be added) and cilantro go in next along with few spices and yogurt.

These are utterly soft and delicious to eat and if you ask me quite wholesome too. You can change up the vegetables – add methi in place of spinach or add grated squash. Either way, these are a welcome switch from usual rotis.

Ingredients (Makes 6-7, 5 inch flatbreads)

  • 1 cup besan (chickpea flour)
  • 1/3 cup atta (whole wheat flour)
  • 1/3 cup chopped onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped spinach
  • 2-3 green chilies (adjust to taste)
  • 1 tbsp grated garlic
  • 1/2 tbsp grated ginger
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1/4 tsp ajwain seeds
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • 2 tbsp whole milk plain yogurt
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp mustard oil + more for cooking
  • water as needed for kneading

Method

In a wide dish or in your food processor add all the ingredients except water and mix to combine. Add water slowly 1-2 tbsp at a time to make a stiff dough. Knead it a few times to bring it into a ball, cover and let rest for 10 mins. After resting, the dough will be soft, since the vegetables release water due to salt. That’s why its important to not make a soft dough to start with.

Pinch 6-8 equal portions. Preheat a griddle/tawa on the stove. Roll on a floured surface into thickish discs. Cook using mustard oil generously-about 1 tbsp oil each side. Flip and cook on other side.

Serve with lauki raita (recipe below)

Lauki Raita

Peel and grate one small lauki. Remove big seeds if any. Yield about 3/4 cup. Add 2-4 tbsp of water and ddd it to a pressure cooker or instant pot and cook for 1 whistle. Cool down completely. Squeeze the liquid out and reserve.

Whisk 1.5 cup thick plain yogurt with 1 tsp roasted cumin, cut up green chillies to taste, 1 tsp kala namak(black salt) and 1/4 tsp sugar. Add table salt to taste. Use the reserved water to thin out the raita as needed. The leftover liquid can be used to make roti dough.

In a small pan, temper 1/2 tbsp cooking oil with some 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds. Once the seeds splutter, add 1/2 tsp red chili powder(or to taste). Pour over the raita and mix. Add some chopped cilantro. Chill for 30 mins and serve.

Enjoy!

Appetizers/Snacks · Breads/Flatbreads · Brunch

Methi Ke Parathe (Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)



Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)I love hot,straight from the griddle flatbreads.With a dollop of butter and chai (tea) on side, the taste is better than the best foods around. Growing up, in my badi mummy’s (grandma) house, winters were a season for parathas of all sorts.On few days we would just feed on stuffed parathas for dinner with home churned white butter and pickled vegetables.It was a simple meal, yet very satisfying. My grandmother used to make parathas with dough kneaded just when it was time to roll the bread,sometimes stuffing the stretchy, gluten layers with shredded mooli (daikon) or spiced crumbled cauliflower, and, a lot of times with the winter greens mixed in to hide but form a robust & flavorful dough. All the greens and vegetables came from the house grown patch, of which I have talked about a lot in my previous posts.On days when the power was out, she would ignite angithis (small clay containers of fire) in the verandah,repeatedly waving old newspapers in front of the glowing coal pieces. If the potatoes were plenty from the yard, they were put as it is inside the gusto of the brazier. We sat around the heated fire,wrapped in sweaters and shawls,our faces lighted by the flickering candles,soaking warmth of the burning charcoal, chit chatting and tearing bites from the fresh made hot parathas. A few potatoes were taken out, smashed with fork, a drizzle of ghee, salt & chill powder and a rustic side was ready.With each morsel,wafted a aromatic steam smelling of garlic, fenugreek and warm spices. Many winter evenings were spent like this, no invertors or generators, a pre convenience era you would say.

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)Making rotis or parathas is such an everyday thing for me. I make flatbreads of some kind each single day, it never feels like a chore, it is such a happy routine. I fail to understand when people say its too much work.They say when you love something you embrace it as joy. Maybe because I am used to it that I secretly enjoy it or I cook because I care.If you have dough in the refrigerator,its a matter of minutes to get the bread together.

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

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Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)The approach of spring season is usually indicative of the end of methi season.To me it leaves behind a similar departed feeling of sorts when fresh tomatoes start vanishing at the knock of fall. I love methi leaves, I am addicted to them, sometimes I specially go to the store just to pick them, they are part of our weekly menu- they are so flavorful, addictively bitter and so good for you. I am yet to spot fresh methi leaves in non- indian grocers here in the States so you will have to make a visit to indian grocery to get these.However, few of my friends compare its taste to fresh watercress sometimes.I haven’t tried the substitution but this recipe can very well be used for any kind of greens you like – think finely shredded rainbow chard, think tucson kale or think good ol’spinach (the cooking variety).

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)I roll the flatbreads both as triangles as well as well in the usual circle shapes. The triangle one needs more oil to be brushed inside layers and definitely comes out much more soft & flaky.You can refer to a previous post on step by step for making triangle paratha. The husband prefers those. But you could do any way. Circles or triangles – they taste awesome!

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)These methi parathas are so easy to make.Throw everything together and knead the dough.They are soft, flaky and packed with taste and nutrients. Let the dough sit in the refrigerator for no more than a day or two and make them to go along with meals or just enjoy rolled up like a cigar all on its own with a cup of chai. I would recommend making them before this winter season goes away.

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Sinfully Spicy : Methi Paratha (Skillet Fried Fenugreek Leaves Flatbread)

Ingredients (Makes 8)

  • 1.5 cup packed fresh/frozen methi (fenugreek leaves, see notes on other greens that can be used)
  • 1.25 cup atta (whole wheat flour)
  • 1/3 cup besan (fine chickpea flour)
  • a generous pinch of hing (asafetida powder)
  • 1/8 tsp ajwain (skip or substitute with celery seeds)
  • heaping 1/4 tsp turmeric powder
  • 3-4 tbsp neutral oil
  • 1 tbsp finely chopped onion
  • 1 scallion(spring onion) stalk, green & white parts finely chopped
  • 3 fat garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2-3 green chillies, finely chopped (adjust to taste)
  • 1/3 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup – 3/4 cup water (or as required, see recipe)
  • Canola Oil for griddle frying (about 2 tbsp per paratha)

Notes 

  1. You can refer to a previous post on triangle paratha on how to shape the flatbreads.
  2. If you want to roll parathas in circles, refer to previous post on rotis on how to do that.
  3. If you do not get fresh methi leaves in the area you live,look for the freezer aisle. They stock frozen methi there. You can use that in this recipe after thawing it and squeezing excess water out.
  4. Important :- Make small batches of this dough.Its gets sticky and soft as it sits and the vegetables start leaving water from the salt. I do not keep it for more than 2 days. The taste changes after a couple of days. You can half the recipe if you want.
  5. This recipe can very well be used for any kind of greens you like – think chard, think tucson kale or think good ol’spinach (the cooking variety).

Method

Pick the methi leaves from stems. Discard the stems and wash the methi leaves under running water so that all the dirt is washed away. Rinse the leaves well. Drain them completely.You don’t need to dry them out but ensure that the are not watery. Use a paper towel if needed. If you are using the frozen variety, squeeze water from the leaves and finely chop the methi leaves. Set aside.

In a wide dish or paraat, mix together flours, ajwain, hing and turmeric. Start adding oil a tablespoon at a time and working in the flours to incorporate. Add the chopped methi leaves next along with onions,scallions, garlic, cilantro, ginger and green chillies. Mix together.

Add little water at a time and knead to a smooth dough. As the flour absorbs water,it will start clumping up into a ball.Continue to add water till all the dry flour becomes wet, your hands will be mighty messy but the flour will come together.Remember not to add too much water at a time.Use your knuckles to flatten the dough out and then pull it all together towards yourself, using your palm & fingers, then knead again with knuckles to flatten out. Knead this way (flatten and bring together) repeatedly for 7-8 minutes. At any point you feel that the flour is tight or drying out, add a light splash water (but not too much)Towards the last 1-2 minutes of kneading, use both hands to knead for a very smooth & elastic dough (this will work up the gluten really fast). Once the dough looks and feels really really smooth, cover with a kitchen towel and let rest for (not more than) 20-25 minutes. Keep in mind not to make a very loose dough because as it sits, it will turn softer and sticky. Once kneaded, let rest for 15-20 minutes.

If you are not planning to make parathas right away, place the dough into an air tight container with lid and refrigerate.

When ready to make parathas, uncover and divide into equal portions. Take each dough portion between palms of your both hands and roll to make as smooth balls as possible. Flatten the balls. Get some loose atta on to the dish. Its time to make roll!

Roll and cover each ball in the loose atta and place on a smooth rolling stone or pastry board or kitchen surface. Flatten out lightly on edges using tips of your finger. Using a rolling-pin, start rolling the dough to a flat circle.Dust the board as and when required when rolling. Initially, you will need to dust more but it will get easier as you continue.Using a rolling-pin, roll the ball into a circle 2.5″ in diameter. Brush a little ghee/oil on the rolled out circle.After brushing the ghee, fold into a semi-circle.Brush the ghee on the semi-circle and fold again to form a triangle.Sprinkle the top with more flour and carefully with the help of rolling-pin, roll out until its 1/8″ thick. Note: While you are rolling out, you will need to flip over, dust flour etc and be gentle to keep the shape intact.You will not get a neat triangle shape but thats how it is.

Spread some oil on the heated tawa/griddle.Carefully lift the rolled out dough with your hands and place on the tawa.Let cook for 2 minutes on medium heat and then flip over using a spatula.Using a spoon,spread 1 tablespoon oil thoroughly on the first side while the second side is cooking.Flip again and repeat brushing oil on the second side.Cook both sides till you see small brown specks and smell the aroma of cooked dough. In some cases the paratha will fluff up while cooking.Dont worry you did a good job if that happens. Be careful of the escaping steam though.

Once cooked & golden brown on both sides, remove from griddle using a spatula & transfer to cooling rack to cool slightly so that they don’t become soggy , later you store them in a box lined with dry cloth or paper towel.

Serve warm with pickle, curries, salad or raita.

Breads/Flatbreads

Roti/Chapati – Everyday Indian Flatbread



Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadI can’t remember a single meal in my home when there weren’t homemade flatbreads to eat.Except a few days when khichdi( gooey lentils & rice) formed dinner, soft and steam filled rotis smothered with homemade ghee or  with grainy white butter were brought fresh off the tawa (griddle) to everyone’s plate.You would hardly count how many you to eat,the ladies of the house took rounds to roll, puff and help each other on occasions like Sunday lunch when the whole family was eating together.Always; there were always plenty for everybody.

Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadMy badi mummy made the best rotis and parathas that I have ever tasted.She rolled perfect rounds,as if  a compass or a cutter has been used with the dough, rotis so soft that you could use just thumb and index fingers to break a bite, perfectly charred with black spots from the high flame on both sides. My mother makes the second best to her, paper-thin and larger rounds but still delicate and slightly chewy.I might already be sounding obsessive with these sorts of descriptions but trust me in indian homes, especially in norther parts,roti making is a serious business.A deft technique which is taught to daughters when their  wedding day approaches. It is the bread of life, something you start and end your day with. Giving away a roti to a needy & poor is symbolic of highest level of ‘punye‘ or good deed in Hindu vedas, it is a thing which subsides the hunger of animals, birds or humans equally. The daily bread is revered.

Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadRoti is a everyday unleavened flatbread in our homes,cooked on stove, chapati is similar to roti just rolled out much thinner, phulka is another name used in India for rotis, a Hindi word denoting the puffy look of it.Parathas(skillet-fried dough) or Pooris (deep fried dough) are also made from the same dough, layered or unlayered, stuffed with fillings, rolled in all different shapes.You could see my triangle paratha as an example. But, necessarily, the dough remains the same. It is only the handling and shaping that differs Hoping I have not confused you too much!

Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadIt would be really surprising but as compared to the naan, which got more popular in the west, in indian homes, you will found rotis and parathas cooked on a daily basis. Naan, fine all purpose flour (maida) flatbread is a once in a while thing, something you order when eating at restaurants or like in my home,when mom made really special exotic curries or we had family gatherings with lots of guests, she would send us with home-made yeasty dough to the street side guy with the tandoor and we came back with stacks of naan for supper.

Let’s get to making some rotis.Shall we? I have invariably used the word ‘atta’ in my post and recipe. Atta is nothing but Hindi for whole wheat flour (loosely used for both dry, wet flour as well as the dough)

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-01Measure the atta (durum wheat flour) and slowly, start adding (warm) water to it.In India, we use a paraat (a utensil made of brass/copper/stainless less specifically for kneading roti dough). The one you see in pictures, is some 40 year old treasure from my grandmother, still going strong.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-02Incorporate water in a circular motion into the atta with your fingers.Start kneading gently.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti, Flour & WaterAs the atta absorbs water,it will start clumping up. Continue to add water till all the dry flour becomes wet, your hands will be mighty messy but the flour starts to come together.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-03At this point,ensure that the atta is not very dry,try to squeeze it between your palms as if making a fist and it should be soft and sticky (and messy!). Start using your knuckles to knead the atta next.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-10Use your knuckles to flatten it out and then pull it all together towards yourself using your palm & fingers,then knead again with knuckles to flatten out. Knead this way (flatten and bring together) repeatedly for 5-7 minutes. At any point you feel that the dough is tight or drying out, add a light splash of warm water.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti, Knead dough with both handsTowards the last 1-2 minutes of kneading, use both hands to knead for a very smooth & elastic dough (this will work up the gluten really fast).You could add a bit to oil while kneading to make it smoother.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-08Time to rest those gluten.Cover with a kitchen towel and let rest for (not more than) 15-18 minutes.You could smear a layer of melted ghee or oil on top but you really do not need it if the proportion of water is correct and you made sure that the dough didn’t feel or look dry when kneading dough will stay moist during rest time but starts losing moisture after 20 minutes. So if you are not planning to make rotis right away, place the dough into an air tight container with lid and refrigerate.

When ready to make rotis, uncover and divide into equal portions. Approximately.If you refrigerated the dough, take it out 10-15 minutes before and let sit on kitchen counter.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-09Take each dough portion between palms of your both hands and roll to make as smooth balls as possible. Flatten the balls. Get some loose atta on to the dish. Its time to make rotis!

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-10Roll each ball in the loose atta and place on a smooth rolling stone or pastry board or kitchen surface. Flatten out lightly from edges using tips of your finger. Using a rolling-pin, start rolling the dough to a flat circle.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-11Dust the board or the roti as and when required when rolling. Initially, you will need to dust more but it will get easier as you continue.

IMG_5871It takes practice to get the shape. Even if you don’t get perfect rounds its okay, doesnt affect the taste.The trick to roll perfect rotis is that when you are rolling the dough it should also be moving in circular direction by itself. If not, you can move it yourself and flatten from all sides to get a 6-7″ round.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-13Another tip (from my grandmother) to get thin edges of rotis is that towards the last 15-20 seconds of rolling, your rolling-pin should be half on the board and half of the roti.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-14Meanwhile, place a tawa (griddle), I use 12″ cast iron on high to heat up. Keep the box lined with kitchen towel near by to store rotis. When the griddle is hot, flour one of your hands and carefully, lift the roti.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-15Place the roti on the hot tawa. Â Cook it for 30-40 seconds (this time will depend on thicken of your roti too) on first side,just so you see the surface changing color or trying slightly. I would say about 25% cooked.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-16Flip using kitchen tongs and let cook for another 30-40 seconds on the other side. You might or might not get charred dots but do not cook on griddle for too long else the rotis will dry out.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-17

Lift the roti with tongs and place it on open flame on the first side directly on fire and very lightly press with tongs to help it puff.Let puff and get charred on first side. About 10-15 seconds.Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti-09Flip and repeat for the second side. If you storing rotis, you should not let it brown too much else it will dry up. Some people like crispy and chewy rotis, so you can char them to liking.

In case, you have a electrical stove with no flame, see the recipe on how to puff up the rotis.

Sinfully Spicy -Step by Step Making Roti, PuffedVery gently press on when you puff the second side too. Smear with ghee and wrap in a kitchen towel to store.

Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadTypically, you can serve rotis as a side bread with all sorts of things – curries (both dry & wet) to lentils to as a wrap or fried and a chips or any which way you like. One of my personal favorites is warm roti, smothered with ghee and sprinkled with sugar, rolled up. In India, it is normal to consume rotis for all meals, two, sometimes three times a day,sometimes in our house we serve roti alongside spicy egg scramble for breakfast or quick lunch too.

One of my close friend once told me a very interesting way to introduce the correct way of eating rotis to the western world.”Use roti as a spoon to eat the curry and later eat the spoon”, he said.Spot on!

Sinfully Spicy - Roti/Chapati, Everyday Indian FlatbreadIn other news, Sinfully Spicy was featured last week by SBS Australia as a favorite indian food blog in their food section. You could read the feature here.

SBS Australia Food Feature

Printable Recipe

Ingredients (Makes 15 rotis roughly 6-6.5″ inch )

  • 2.5 cups durum wheat atta (fine ground whole wheat flour made from durum wheat)
  • 1 +1/4 cup warm water or more/less if needed

Also Required

  • 1/2 tbsp – 1 tbsp any neutral oil (to moisten the dough when it rests, optional)
  • Ghee to spread on warm, cooked rotis (optional but recommended)
  • about 3/4 cup dry atta, needed when rolling the rotis

Tools Needed

  • A wide, heavy shallow dish large enough to knead and dough. In India, we use a paraat (a brass or stainless less dish specifically for kneading roti dough). You could use your mixing bowl too but a wide dish will make it a lot easier.
  • A flat, clean, smooth rolling stone or surface
  • Rolling Pin
  • 2-3 kitchen towels (to cover the dough when resting as well as to wrap the cooked rotis)
  • 1-2 sheets of paper towel (I line the kitchen towel with paper towel to absorb the moisture when storing rotis else they turn too soggy)
  • A wide container (8-10 inch in diameter) with lid to store the wrapped rotis. If you do not have, you could use a couple of dinner plates.
  • Tawa or cast iron griddle (I use my 12″) to cook the rotis.
  • A pair of tongs to be used when puffing the rotis on direct flame

Method

There are superior varieties of Indian wheat which are stone ground to make atta (fine whole wheat flour). Largely, you could choose between durum wheat or sharbati wheat. Infact, a lot of leading atta brands in India now have a mix of both. It is important to understand that atta  is different from the pastry whole wheat flour available in baking aisles. It is a much fine ground which make the rotis soft and less chewy.You will need to visit indian/pakistani grocery stores to get it.There are multigrain and high fibre atta varieties also available and all are suitable for making rotis. A 10lb pack will usually cost you $7-$8 and it has a really good shelf life of 3-4 months.

In a wide, shallow dish measure and place the atta. With one hand slowly start adding (warm) water and mixing in circular motion with the fingers of other hand. Incorporate water a little at a time and start to kneading gently.

As the atta absorbs water,it will start clumping up into a ball.Continue to add warm water till all the dry flour becomes wet, your hands will be mighty messy but the flour will come together.Remember not to add too much water at a time.

Once a ball is formed, ensure that it is not very dry by trying to squeeze the dough ball between your palms as if making a fist and it should feel soft and sticky. Start using your knuckles to knead the dough next.

Use your knuckles to flatten the dough out and then pull it all together towards yourself, using your palm & fingers, then knead again with knuckles to flatten out. Knead this way (flatten and bring together) repeatedly for 7-8 minutes. At any point you feel that the dough is tight or drying out, add a light splash of warm water.The dough should not feel or look dry at any point.

Towards the last 1-2 minutes of kneading, use both hands to knead for a very smooth & elastic dough (this will work up the gluten really fast). Once the dough looks and feels really really smooth, cover with a kitchen towel and let rest for (not more than) 20-25 minutes.You could smear a layer of melted ghee or oil on top but you really will not need it if the proportion of water is correct and you made sure that the dough didn’t feel or look dry when kneading. The dough will stay moist during rest time but starts losing moisture after 30 minutes. So if you are not planning to make rotis right away, place the dough into an air tight container with lid and refrigerate.

When ready to make rotis, uncover and divide into equal portions. Approximately.(Note: If you refrigerated the dough, take it out 10-15 minutes before and let sit on kitchen counter)

Take each dough portion between palms of your both hands and roll to make as smooth balls as possible. Flatten the balls. Get some loose atta on to the dish. Its time to make rotis!

Roll and cover each ball in the loose atta and place on a smooth rolling stone or pastry board or kitchen surface. Flatten out lightly on edges using tips of your finger. Using a rolling-pin, start rolling the dough to a flat circle.Dust the board or the roti as and when required when rolling. Initially, you will need to dust more but it will get easier as you continue.

It takes practice to get the perfect circle shape. Even if you don’t get perfect rounds its okay, it doesn’t affect the taste. The trick to roll perfect rotis is that when after 1-2 minutes into rolling the dough it should also be moving in circular direction by itself. If its your first time, this might not happen but remember practice will make you better and better each time. If not, you can move the roti yourself to roll and evenly flatten from all sides to get a 6-7″ round.

Another tip to get thin edges of rotis is that towards the last 15-20 seconds of rolling, your rolling-pin should be half on the board and half of the roti as you roll.

Meanwhile, place a tawa (griddle), I use 12″ cast iron on to heat up on high. Keep the box lined with kitchen towel near by to store rotis. When the griddle is hot, flour one of your hands and carefully, lift the roti.

Place the rolled roti on the hot tawa. Â Cook it for 30-40 seconds (this time will depend on thicken of your roti too) on first side,just so you see the surface changing color or trying slightly. I would say about 25% cooked.

Flip using kitchen tongs and let cook on the griddle on the second side for another 30-40 seconds. You might or might not get charred dots but do not cook on griddle for too long else the rotis will dry out.When you cook on the second side, you will see that little puffs coming up on the surface.

Lift the roti with tongs and place it on open flame on the first side directly on fire and very lightly press with tongs to help it puff.Let puff and get charred on first side. About 10-15 seconds.

Flip and repeat for the second side. If you storing rotis, you should not let it brown too much else it will dry up. Some people like crispy and chewy rotis, so you can char a little longer to liking.

In case you do not have electrical stove, you can puff up the rotis on the griddle itself. Once the second side is cooked, reduce the heat to medium and gently start pressing the roti with a soft kitchen towel on all side. It will puff up.

Smear ghee on the hot rotis and server right away or store then wrapped in a kitchen towel. I line the kitchen towel with a small piece of paper towel, this helps in preventing them from getting soggy.

In case you want to freeze the rotis (yes it can be done), make all the rotis and let them cool down to room temperature wrapped inside the towel. Then stack them on top of each other with a large piece of wax or parchment paper in between.

When wanting to use the frozen rotis, thaw them in the fridge and warm up on high for 8-10 seconds in the microwave.

Notes

  1. Roll the dough very well and as evenly thin as possible.This helps in puffing up the rotis.
  2. Store the leftover dough in the refrigerator for not more than 1-2 days in an air tight container.
  3. If you are wanting to serve rotis later in the day, you can make ahead them. In this case, add 2 tbsp of melted ghee while making the dough.They will remain soft.

Enjoy & Thanks for stopping by!